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Social Self-Esteem Test

Social Identity Theory posits that there are two aspects of self-concept: personal and social identity. This test measures your social self-esteem, that is, your self-esteem as related to group membership and identity markers.

In this context, a social group may refer to categories such as ethnicity, gender, nationality, socioeconomic class, and occupation. The Social Self-Esteem Test is inspired by research from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Want to know your self-esteem profile? For each of the following questions, indicate how well it describes you below.

Question 1 of 16

Social groups include ethnicity, gender, nationality, socioeconomic background, and occupation.

The social groups I belong to are an important reflection of who I am.

Disagree
Agree

NEXT

The Social Self-Esteem Test is inspired by the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES) authored by Riia Luhtanen and Jennifer Crooker at the State University of New York. IDRlabs is not affiliated with either author or the State University of New York or any other institution.

The test provides feedback such as the following:

Membership self-esteem: Denotes the extent to which you manifest positive judgments when assessing whether or not you are a good or worthy member of the social groups to which you belong.

Private social self-esteem: Reflects self-evaluations related to your perception of how good or worthy your social groups are, i.e., your beliefs about your own groups.

Public social self-esteem: Represents personal judgments of other evaluations of your own social groups, i.e., how you believe other people evaluate your groups.

Importance to identity: Measures how important being a member of your social group is to your personal feeling of identity.

Total social self-esteem: Indicates how being a member of your social group influences your self-concept and identity as related to social self-esteem. Higher scores indicate higher social self-esteem.

Social self-esteem is the way we view ourselves in social situations and how we perceive others' opinions of us. It is an important aspect of our overall self-esteem, as it impacts how we feel about ourselves in relation to others and how we interact with them.

High social self-esteem is characterized by a positive view of oneself in social situations and the belief that others view us positively as well. People with high social self-esteem tend to have good social skills and are able to form and maintain positive relationships with others. They are also more likely to engage in social activities and feel comfortable in social settings.

On the other hand, low social self-esteem is characterized by a negative view of oneself in social situations and the belief that others view us negatively as well. People with low social self-esteem may have difficulty forming and maintaining relationships with others and may avoid social situations or feel anxious about them. They may also have lower levels of social support, which can impact their overall well-being.

Social self-esteem can be influenced by a variety of factors, including past experiences, relationships, and cultural norms. It can also be affected by negative self-talk and self-defeating beliefs about oneself and one's abilities in social situations.

Improving social self-esteem requires a combination of changing negative thoughts and behaviors and seeking support and validation from others. This may involve seeking therapy or joining a support group, practicing assertive communication and social skills, setting goals and working towards them. It may also involve seeking out positive relationships and building a strong social support network.

Overall, social self-esteem is an important aspect of our overall well-being and can impact our ability to form and maintain positive relationships with others. It is important to work on building and maintaining a healthy level of social self-esteem in order to feel confident and comfortable in social situations and to have fulfilling and supportive relationships.

The IDRlabs Social Self-Esteem Test is inspired by the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES) authored by Riia Luhtanen and Jennifer Crooker at the State University of New York. While the IDRlabs Self-Esteem Test is based on the CSES, it cannot be used to provide clinical assessments or accurate evaluation of your personality. Clinical assessments should always be done in cooperation with a mental health professional. For more information about any of our online tests and quizzes, please consult our Terms of Service.

Why Use This Test?

1. Free. The Social Self-Esteem Test is provided to you free of charge and allows you to obtain your scores related to social self-esteem in several different domains.

2. Scholarly oriented. Feedback derived from this test is based on the research of professionals in the field of autism with the intent of delivering a clear picture of the respondent’s characteristics indicating the level of autism as measured according to standardized items in a self-report questionnaire format.

3. Acceptable validity and reliability. The internal consistency as measured using Cronbachs’ alpha was good (.88).

4. Statistical controls. Test scores are logged into an anonymized database. Statistical analysis of the test is conducted to ensure maximum accuracy and validity of the test scores.

5. Made by professionals. The present test has been made with the input of people who work professionally with psychology and individual differences research.