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Multidimensional HSP Test

Are you a highly sensitive person?

A highly sensitive person (HSP), as conceptualized by psychologist Elaine Aron, encompasses a range of traits and characteristics that influence how individuals perceive and interact with their environment. While traditional measures have focused primarily on a single dimension of sensitivity, this test takes a holistic approach, recognizing that sensitivity manifests in multiple facets of personality and behavior.

Do you have HSP traits? For each of the following statements, indicate how well it applies to you.

Question 1 of 30

I experience emotional highs and lows more intensely than most people around me.

Disagree
Agree

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The IDRlabs Multidimensional HSP Test is based on peer-reviewed, trait-based research, including Smolewska, K. A., McCabe, S. B., & Woody, E. Z. (2006). A psychometric evaluation of the Highly Sensitive Person Scale: The components of sensory-processing sensitivity and their relation to the BIS/BAS and “Big Five”. Personality and Individual Differences, 40(6), 1269–1279.

The test measures dimensions of HSP, and the highly sensitive person construct, such as the following:

Sensory Sensitivity: This foundational facet epitomizes a heightened receptivity to physical stimuli encompassing light, sound, smells, and textures. HSPs may find intense sensory input overwhelming, leading to discomfort or distress in their surroundings.

Emotional Reactivity: Characterized by intensified emotional experiences, HSPs often find themselves deeply moved by joy, beauty, or other positive sentiments while simultaneously susceptible to heightened feelings of sadness, frustration, or anger in response to adversity.

Empathic Ability: Rooted in their meticulous processing of emotions and social cues, HSPs harbor a profound capacity for empathy. They possess an innate aptitude for discerning and understanding the emotions of others, attuned to even the most nuanced shifts in mood.

Aesthetic Sensitivity: HSPs demonstrate a pronounced affinity for art, music, and nature, indicative of their heightened sensitivity to the beauty and aesthetics present in their environment. This facet underscores their ability to derive profound meaning and pleasure from sensory experiences.

Need for Solitude: HSPs frequently grapple with overstimulation in social settings or bustling environments, necessitating periods of solitude for rejuvenation and reflection. These individuals prioritize solitude as a means to recalibrate and process their internal experiences.

Vivid Inner Life: HSPs harbor a rich inner landscape teeming with imagination and introspection. Their propensity for deep reflection, daydreaming, and fantasy underscores their vibrant inner world, which serves as a sanctuary for processing thoughts and emotions.

Total HSP: Your total degree of HSP traits. Higher scores indicate a greater likelihood of being an HSP.

The test was made on the basis of the following research: Jagiellowicz, J., Xu, X., Aron, A., Aron, E. N., Cao, G., Feng, T., & Weng, X. (2011). The trait of sensory processing sensitivity and neural responses to changes in visual scenes. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 6(1), 38–47. Acevedo, B. P., Aron, E. N., Aron, A., Sangster, M.-D., Collins, N., & Brown, L. L. (2014). The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others’ emotions. Brain and Behavior, 4(4), 580–594. Liss, M., Mailloux, J., & Erchull, M. J. (2008). The relationships between sensory processing sensitivity, alexithymia, autism, depression, and anxiety. Personality and Individual Differences, 45(3), 255–259. Smolewska, K. A., McCabe, S. B., & Woody, E. Z. (2006). A psychometric evaluation of the Highly Sensitive Person Scale: The components of sensory-processing sensitivity and their relation to the BIS/BAS and “Big Five”. Personality and Individual Differences, 40(6), 1269–1279.

As the publishers of this free test, which allows you to screen yourself for having HSP traits, we strived to make the test as reliable and valid as possible by subjecting this test to statistical controls and validation. However, free online quizzes such as the present test do not provide professional assessments or recommendations of any kind; the test is provided entirely “as-is.” For more information about any of our online tests and quizzes, please consult our Terms of Service.

Why Use This Test?

1. Free. This test is delivered to you free of charge and will allow you to obtain your scores related to your HSP traits.

2. Statistical controls. Statistical analysis of the test is conducted to ensure maximum accuracy and validity of the test scores.

3. Made by professionals. The present test has been made with the input of people who work professionally with psychology and individual differences research.